Asylum seeker’s play is London bound

By Peter Stanners

A play written by a tortured Cameroonian asylum seeker who lives in Greater Manchester will now be shown in London.

Lydia Besong’s play ‘How I Became an Asylum Seeker’ will be performed at the Break the Silence event on Sunday 28 November, at 3pm, at the Riverside Studios.

The event, organised by Women For Refugee Women (WRW), aims to shine a light on the hidden experiences of women who seek asylum in the UK.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

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Somalian mum and kids go missing

By Peter Stanners

MANCHESTER Mouth has learnt that the disappearance of a Somalian mother and her two children from their Manchester home is worrying local police.

Anisa Ibrahim, 30, from Withington, Manchester, and her sons Khalid and Ahmed Abubakar, aged five and three, have not been seen since 6 April 2010.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Students strive for Malawi

THREE Greater Manchester students are currently visiting Malawi to see how a water pump has changed the lives of local people.

Wai-San Li, Jennifer Lloyd and Dan Owens want to find out how the pump, which was paid for by sales of One Water at University of Salford’s campus, has benefitted the pupils from the Lipongwe LEA school it was donated to.

They are all visiting Africa for the first time on this trip and hope their visit will have a significant impact on lives of local children.

“We want to see how the play pump has benefitted the children directly – we want to meet the children and their family and teachers,” Parasitology PHD student Li told Manchester Mouth.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Joseph is UK student of the year

THE UNIVERSITY of Manchester’s Joseph Akinnagbe has been voted the nation’s Student of the Year.

The 19-year-old, who is originally from Nigeria but now resides in Barking, London, was presented with the NUS/ Endsleigh Student of the Year award because of his outstanding work supporting his fellow students, the Students’ Union and a range of community and business projects.

Speaking to Manchester Mouth a delighted Akinnagbe said: “Awards provide validation of what you’re doing but it means that much more when you are being recognised by a union of students like yourself. Big thanks to NUS and Endsleigh.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

City release international trio

MANCHESTER City has announced that it will not be renewing the contracts of three of its international stars.

The football club has decided that Martin Petrov, Sylvinho and Benjani will be allowed to negotiate fresh deals with new clubs as their contracts with The Blues have run out.

To read the rest of this story visit the Sports section of the main Manchester Mouth website.

Refugees party in Manchester

WITH summer on its way carnival season has hit the North West in the form of Manchester’s Exodus Festival.

A unique celebration of refugee arts and culture the festival, which takes place on 18 July 2010 outside Manchester Town Hall, is a vibrant mix of contemporary and traditional music, dance and culture from around the world and exciting cross-cultural collaborations.

Now in its ninth year, Exodus was set up to promote creative activity and social engagement for refugees and asylum seekers and local communities.

“Exodus is about challenging negative representations, supporting the arts and culture of people in exile and promoting cultural cohesion through cultural exchange, and most important creating a voice for refugees and asylum seekers in Greater Manchester,” Exodus coordinator Katherine Rogers told Manchester Mouth.

To read the rest of this story visit the  Culture section of Manchester Mouth’s main website.

Chief runs for Africa kids charity

CHIEF constable Peter Fahy raised  £365 for street children in Africa by going the distance at Sunday’s Great Manchester Run.

It took him 55 minutes and six seconds to cross the line and raise money for Retrak a Manchester-based charity giving street children in Ethiopia, Uganda and Nairobi, Kenya, an alternative to life on the street.

Read the rest of this story on the main Manchester Mouth website.