Italian eatery opens in Stockport

By Peter Stanners

Manchester Mouth’s newest recruit reviews the new eatery that is pioneering Stockport’s cosmopolitan revival.

An ambitious sibling team has opened an Italian coffee house and restaurant in the heart of Stockport.

Taking over the site of the old Stockport Arms on Petersgate, Da Vinci’s is a gift to Stockport, offering incredible food in a cosy environment with great value for money.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Lady From The Sea-Royal Exchange, Manchester

By Sadia Habib

Manchester Mouth’s entertainment guru gets to grips with the choppy waters of love in her review of Sarah Frankcom’s production of ‘The Lady from the Sea’ at Royal Exchange theatre.

Henrik Ibsen’s The Lady From The Sea beautifully illustrates the dilemma encountered by the dreamer Ellida as she struggles between honouring her commitments to her husband and her step-daughters or opting for a life with a past lover – The Stranger (Bill Ward)- who has happened to return to her life.

Apparently Ibsen was inspired by Norwegian folk tales in the writing of The Lady From The Sea. One of the legends concerned a sailor who returned home to find that his wife had assumed he was dead at sea and thus re-married. This legend is cleverly explored in this production and incorporated in the stories told by Ellida (Neve McIntosh).

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Love On The Dole – Octagon, Bolton

By Sadia Habib

Manchester Mouth’s entertainment guru talks economic turmoil in her review of David Thacker’s adaptation of ‘Love On The Dole’ the Octagon, Bolton.

Octagon’s Love On The Dole is based on a 1930s Walter Greenwood novel (which was later adapted by Ronald Gow). Born in 1903 in Ellor Street, Salford, Greenwood inherited his parents’ and grandparents’ ambitions to leave behind this neighbourhood with its “jungles of tiny houses cramped and huddled together” in which “men and women are born, live, love and die and pay preposterous rents for the privilege of calling the grimy houses ‘home'”.

Throughout Thacker’s production we see how poverty pervades the lives of the characters of Hanky Park, a working-class community in Salford. The characters are struggling to get by on the pittance earned and this tale highlights the plight of those who are desperate to get out, “Hanky Park…we can’t get away…it gets everybody”.

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

A Streetcar Named Desire – Octagon, Bolton.

Manchester Mouth’s entertainment guru Sadia Habib reviews David Thacker’s adaptation of Tennessee Williams’s ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ at the Octagon, Bolton.

A classic play that some would say is synonymous with a young and unknown Marlon Brando. If you have seen the film adaptation you will have high expectations of Thacker’s production and these will be fulfilled.

The star of the show is Clare Foster (Blanche Dubois) for she manages to carry each of her scenes with energy and intensity in a long production, which reminds the audience of Blanche’s very nervous disposition. 

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Chomet’s film: Illusionist or hypnotist?

MANCHESTER Mouth’s movie magician Tony Boffey explains why Sylvain Chomet’s new animated film ‘The Illusionist’ may not enchant audiences.

Chomet’s new stunningly hand-drawn animated film is possibly not as immediately satisfying as his previous effort, the madcap Belleville Rendevous.

In that film you were distracted from the fact that there was a lack of emotional punch by the wildly over the top globetrotting Tour De France/mafia infused plot, terrific set pieces, hilariously eccentric character designs and delightful visual gags in every frame. The Illusionist moves at a different pace altogether.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Rafta Rafta – Octagon, Bolton

MANCHESTER Mouth community reporter Sadia Habib reviews ‘Rafta Rafta’ showing at Octagon Theatre, Bolton.

Maybe you missed the popular and successful 2007 run of Rafta Rafta in London.  Luckily it is showing again and this time at a local venue – Octagon Theatre in Bolton.

Rafta Rafta is an adaptation of Bill Naughton’s play ‘All In Good Time’ by Ayub Khan-Din, who wrote the well-known hit ‘East is East’.

Set in Bolton, Greater Manchester, Rafta Rafta explores the life of an immigrant Indian family.

To read the rest of this review visit the Culture section of the main Manchester Mouth website.

Not so controversial

Manchester Mouth’s movie expert Tony Boffey claims that Chris Morris’s new film ‘Four Lions’ is not as taboo as it is made out to be.

Speaking at the UK Premiere of Four Lions at the Bradford International Film Festival, Morris said that trying to break taboos is “one of the most boring things you can do. If that’s what you’re interested in, you might as well give up now”.

The creative force behind ‘The Day Today’, ‘Brass Eye’, ‘Jam’ and the BAFTA winning short film ‘My Wrongs #8245–8249 & 117’ also claimed: “Nothing I’ve done I would classify as controversial.” Despite his debut feature being a slapstick comedy about a group of incompetent suicide bombers, I can see his point.

To read the rest of this review visit the culture section of the main Manchester Mouth website.