New centre to make Muslims moderate

By Peter Stanners

A new Islamic community centre is apparently being set up in Manchester to encourage British Muslims into integrate local society.

The Kuwaiti News Agency (KUNA) has reported that a ‘moderation centre’ is being established in the North West on instruction from the Kuwaiti royal family in order to encourage a more moderate reading of Islam, raising eyebrows in local Muslim communities.

“Muslims in the West must break free from fear on their identity and positively blend in society and present a bright image of moderate Islam,” Dr Adel Al-Falah, Kuwaiti Undersecretary of the Ministry of Awqaf and Islamic Affairs, told KUNA.

To read the rest of this story visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Manchester Zombie Pride Photos

 

Zombie Pride raises £2k for the LGF

By Peter Stanners                                                       

Zombie Pride returned with a vengeance to raise more than £2000 for the Lesbian and Gay Foundation.

The Halloween fundraiser, which took place on Saturday 30 October 2010, crept through Manchester’s Canal Street on a monster bar crawl before taking over a decked-out Legends nightclub for three floors of hair-raising hi-jinks.

Bollox, KBeard, Trash-O-Rama and Bad Taste Barbies offered their musical talents for free for the event and Legends also donated the venue.

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Forum celebrates Muslims that saved Jews

By Peter Stanners

A local inter-faith group has celebrated the brave Muslims who saved Jewish lives in World War Two.

On Sunday 23 October 2010 Manchester Muslim Jewish Forum members and local dignitaries attended the 70 Righteous Muslims Who Saved Jews In The Second World War event to remember the strong ties between Islam and Judaism.

Cllr Mark Hackett, Lord Mayor of Manchester, attended the celebration at Manchester Jewish Museum along with 80 other guests.

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Lady From The Sea-Royal Exchange, Manchester

By Sadia Habib

Manchester Mouth’s entertainment guru gets to grips with the choppy waters of love in her review of Sarah Frankcom’s production of ‘The Lady from the Sea’ at Royal Exchange theatre.

Henrik Ibsen’s The Lady From The Sea beautifully illustrates the dilemma encountered by the dreamer Ellida as she struggles between honouring her commitments to her husband and her step-daughters or opting for a life with a past lover – The Stranger (Bill Ward)- who has happened to return to her life.

Apparently Ibsen was inspired by Norwegian folk tales in the writing of The Lady From The Sea. One of the legends concerned a sailor who returned home to find that his wife had assumed he was dead at sea and thus re-married. This legend is cleverly explored in this production and incorporated in the stories told by Ellida (Neve McIntosh).

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

LGF launch Pop-in counselling service

By Pete Stanners

Manchester’s Lesbian and Gay Foundation officially launched its Pop-In counselling service at a special event for National Coming Out Day.

The foundation (LGF) announced its new service, which provides 40-minute no appointment necessary sessions for people with trained support staff, at Come in, Come Out last week.

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk

Love On The Dole – Octagon, Bolton

By Sadia Habib

Manchester Mouth’s entertainment guru talks economic turmoil in her review of David Thacker’s adaptation of ‘Love On The Dole’ the Octagon, Bolton.

Octagon’s Love On The Dole is based on a 1930s Walter Greenwood novel (which was later adapted by Ronald Gow). Born in 1903 in Ellor Street, Salford, Greenwood inherited his parents’ and grandparents’ ambitions to leave behind this neighbourhood with its “jungles of tiny houses cramped and huddled together” in which “men and women are born, live, love and die and pay preposterous rents for the privilege of calling the grimy houses ‘home'”.

Throughout Thacker’s production we see how poverty pervades the lives of the characters of Hanky Park, a working-class community in Salford. The characters are struggling to get by on the pittance earned and this tale highlights the plight of those who are desperate to get out, “Hanky Park…we can’t get away…it gets everybody”.

To read the rest of this review visit ManchesterMouth.co.uk